College dating abuse statistics

When we talk about major concerns facing LGBTQ youth, we typically discuss topics like bias-based bullying and harassment or familial rejection and homelessness; and when we talk about violence facing the larger LGBTQ community, we typically discuss hate crimes.

In other words, we talk about the violence facing our community from those outside it, from those who are openly homophobic and transphobic, but what about the violence happening within our community?

As difficult as it may be to admit, LGBTQ people – including LGBTQ youth – can be and are perpetrators of violence as well as its victims, and too often, that violence occurs in the context of romantic and/or sexual relationships.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), lesbians and gay men experience equal or higher levels of intimate partner violence (IPV) as heterosexuals, with bisexual women suffering much higher rates of IPV in comparison to lesbians, gay men and heterosexual women.

The rates of sexual victimization for LGB respondents was 23.2 percent, nearly double that of heterosexual youth, of whom 12.3 percent reported sexual coercion.Transgender youth reported the highest rates of dating violence, with 88.9 percent reporting physical dating violence.The Urban Institute’s study also showed that LGB youth were much more likely than their heterosexual peers to be perpetrators of dating violence.While the Urban Institute’s report did not provide much of a discussion of either the causes or effects of LGBTQ teen dating violence, there may be similarities to certain findings among non-LGBTQ youth.Studies of teen dating violence have found, for example, that youth who experience parental violence are more likely to report violence within their own teen dating relationships.

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